Flood Information

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Municipal and Sanitary District Contacts

*For flood information please contact the municipality you live in as a first point of contact.


NEWS RELEASES

DATE:  Aug. 21, 2018 (p.m. posting)
CONTACTS:  Jennifer Sereno, communications, 608-770-8084, Jennifer.Sereno@madsewer.org
SUBJECT:  Sewerage district crews document overflows

MADISON, WIS. – Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District crews have documented six sanitary overflow locations in Madison and neighboring communities following the record-breaking storm overnight Monday.

Stormwater flooding throughout the area contributed to the sanitary overflows. Although the district’s regional wastewater collection system operates separately from municipal stormwater sewers, heavy rains infiltrate the wastewater system through multiple paths including basement floor drains when stormwater enters basements. 

Working in coordination with crews from the City of Madison, City of Middleton and the district’s other customer communities, the following sanitary overflows have been documented:

  • Three manholes near Waite Circle and Chippewa Drive in the Nakoma area.
  • Two manholes near Indian Hills Park on the near West side.
  • A manhole near Spoke and Sprocket drives along the Cannonball Path in the City of Fitchburg.
  • A manhole on John Q. Hammons Drive near the Madison Marriott West in the City of Middleton.
  • A manhole near Locust Drive and Rose Place in the Village of Shorewood Hills
  • A manhole near Glenway and Monroe streets, in the UW–Madison Arboretum near Arbor Drive.

District crews have placed berms to contain any residual water and are in the process of cleaning up debris and spreading lime as a health precaution. The district encourages residents to report missing manhole covers, water flowing across roads and water entering homes through sanitary connections.

Residents are encouraged to direct their initial contact to their local municipality or sanitary district, which allows crews to coordinate for a timely response. A list of community contacts can be found at http://www.madsewer.org/floodassistance.

In general, residents experiencing flooding including basements backups should:

  • Treat all floodwaters as contaminated.
  • Be aware of the risk of electrocution. Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off the electricity to prevent electric shock.
  • Avoid wading in floodwater, which can contain dangerous debris and be contaminated.

By late Tuesday, flows at the district’s Nine Springs Wastewater Treatment Plant had been reduced to a rate of 100 million gallons per day, down from a recorded peak flow rate of 155 million gallons per day. The district typically handles an average daily flow of 42 million gallons. More than two dozen district crew members worked throughout the day to inspect and monitor the more than 141 miles of district-owned pipe.

Overnight Monday, the district’s 18 major pumping stations performed as intended to handle the extreme weather. However, as water continued to enter the system through the morning Tuesday, the volume in some areas of the system exceeded capacity and overflows occurred.  

“We appreciate the notifications from community members as it has allowed us to reach and inspect priority areas,” said Michael Mucha, the district’s chief engineer and director. “We continue to work in partnership with our customer communities in addressing the challenges associated with the flooding.”

District staff members have notified the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and Public Health Madison and Dane County. For more information about Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District’s regional collection system and the Nine Springs Wastewater Treatment Plant, visit www.madsewer.org

ABOUT THE DISTRICT
Established in 1930 to protect the lakes and streams of the upper Yahara watershed, Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District today serves 26 Madison area customer communities covering some 184 square miles and 360,000 people. The district owns and operates 141 miles of pipe and 18 regional pumping stations that convey approximately 42 million gallons of wastewater to the Nine Springs Wastewater Treatment Plant each day. Organized as a municipal corporation, the district is a leader in sustainability and resource reclamation; its rates are established by the Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District Commission.


DATE:  Aug. 21, 2018 (a.m. posting)
CONTACTS:  Jennifer Sereno, communications, 608-770-8084, Jennifer.Sereno@madsewer.org
SUBJECT:  Sanitary sewer overflows reported in wake of overnight storm

MADISON, WIS. – Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District crews are responding to numerous reports of sanitary sewer overflows Tuesday in the wake of Monday evening’s storm.

Although the district’s regional wastewater collection system operates separately from municipal storm water sewers, heavy rains infiltrate the wastewater system through multiple ways including basement floor drains.  

In many areas, flooding and basement backups are resulting from excess stormwater. Sanitary backups are currently being reported in areas of Fitchburg, on Madison’s far West Side near the Madison Marriott West and in the Spring Harbor neighborhood.

Residents experiencing flooding including basements backups should:

  • Treat all floodwaters as contaminated.
  • Be aware of the risk of electrocution. Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off the electricity to prevent electric shock.
  • Avoid wading in floodwater, which can contain dangerous debris and be contaminated.
  • Report missing manhole covers, water flowing across roads or entering your home through sanitary connections. Contact your local municipality or sanitary district with this information. A list can be found below. 

Through Tuesday morning, the district’s Nine Springs Wastewater Treatment plant recorded peak flow at a rate of 155 million gallons per day, compared with an average daily flow of 42 million gallons. More than two dozen district crew members remain out monitoring the more than 141 miles of district-owned pipe.

Through the night, the district’s 18 major pumping stations performed as intended to handle extreme weather, however, as water continued to enter the system Tuesday, the volume in some areas of the system exceeded capacity. Due to continued high waters and volume in various areas of the collection system, residents are encouraged to take steps to reduce water use for the day until system flows return to closer to normal.

Additional Resources
TIPS

  • Listen to authorities for information and instructions. Return home only when authorities say it is safe.
  • Avoid driving, except in emergencies.
  • Snakes and other animals may be in your house. Wear heavy gloves and boots during clean up.
  • Be aware of the risk of electrocution. Do not touch electrical equipment if it is wet or if you are standing in water. If it is safe to do so, turn off the electricity to prevent electric shock.
  • Avoid wading in floodwater, which can contain dangerous debris and be contaminated. Underground or downed power lines can also electrically charge the water.
  • Use a generator or other gasoline-powered machinery ONLY outdoors and away from windows.
    Resource: www.ready.gov/floods

TIPS for Properly Cleaning Up After Floods
Resource: www.cityofmadison.com/news/properly-cleaning-up-after-floods